It’s raining … An excuse to stay home and eat champorado

Champorado or Chocolate Rice Porridge

Lazy Sunday afternoon, 71°F , New York City

Even when I was still full from lunch, I couldn’t help but salivate when I saw the  picture of  New Yorker Betsy Rhae Vergara’s home cooked champorado on Facebook. She paired her version with danggit, salten-dried variety of fish that is a popular Cebuano product. Her picture brought back memories of the days when we used to have champorado and tuyo (dried salted fish best eaten when dipped in vinegar with garlic and Bicolano chili or ‘labuyo) at least once week. The last time I checked, no Filipino restaurant in NYC serves this Filipino favorite on their menu yet.

Champorado or chocolate rice pudding is made with glutinous rice cooked and sweetened cocoa powder  or cocoa blocks. Evaporated milk is sometimes added just before serving to loosen up the sticky consistency of the porridge. Whenever I cook it, I put coffee (instant or freshly brewed espresso) to give it that bitter coffee taste that I prefer.

Chocolate is a much beloved Mexican cooking ingredient. While they cook their meats, vegetables and practically everything in chocolate, we relegated its use to desserts, drinks and sweets. This breakfast or snack dish is actually an adapted version of their Champurado, a thick chocolate drink usually eaten with churros (long and fried pastry that originated from Spain).  When our Mexican brothers  entered the country through the Spanish Galleon Trade, they introduced this delicacy to the natives. Owing to our love of rice, we cooked it with the sticky grains and dropped the churros altogether, then ate it with what else —tuyo!

TIP: Try eating it with a few drops of spiced Datu Puti vinegar as well.

Betsy Rhae Vergara's Champorado or Chocolate Rice Porridge

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